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UMASS/AMHERST 




312Dbb 0271 3HSb 5 




MASSACHUSETTS DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

MARCH, 1978 



MASSACHUSETTS BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Charles T. Grigsby, Chairperson 

Anne H. McHugh, Vice Chairperson 

Mary Barros 

John W. Bond 

Richard E. Cohen 

James L. Green 

Howard A. Greis 

Mary Ann Hardenbergh 

Julian T. Houston 

Joseph C. Mello, Jr. 

Edward E. Phillips 

Edwin M. Rossman 

Gregory R. Anrig, Commissioner of Education, Secretary 

Ex-Officio Member: 

Leroy Keith, Jr., Chancellor, Board of Higher Education 



L 



Bureau of Research and Assessment 
Allan S. Hartman, Director 
Leslie S. May, Associate Director 
Matthew H. Towle, Associate Director 



The New England Regional Office of the College Board 
Arthur J. Doyle, Director 
Patricia Welch, Assistant Director 



Produced by the Bureau of Educational Information Services 
Richard Gilman, Director 
Cynthia Nadreau, Publications Coordinator 
Michaela Meduna, Graphic Artist 



The Massachusetts Department of Education ensures equal employment/educational 
opportunities/affirmative action, regardless of race, color, creed, national origin or sex, in 
compliance with Title IX, or handicap, in compliance with Section 504. 







TEST SCORES: 





AN UPDATE ON STATE, REGIONAL AND NATIONAL 
TRENDS ON COLLEGE BOARD EXAMINATIONS 



PREPARED BY: 

LESLIE STEVEN MAY 
BUREAU OF RESEARCH AND ASSESSMENT 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



I. INTRODUCTION 

II. HIGHLIGHTS OF TRENDS 

III. TABLES ON COLLEGE BOARD EXAMINATION TRENDS 

Scholastic Aptitude Test Trends 

Test of Standard Written English Trends 

Achievement Test Trends 

Selected Statistics on College-Bound Seniors 

Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude/NMSQT Test Trends 

IV. SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY AND INFORMATION CONTACTS 

APPENDIX 

Massachusetts Cities and Towns by "Kind of Community' 



3 

8 
10 



26 

27 



I. INTRODUCTION 



OF? 



n ':'-".----.'k : 









PURPOSE OF THIS PUBLICATION 

The purpose of this publication is to provide school committee members, 
school administrators, counselors, teachers, parents, and other citizens in 
Massachusetts with information on recent experiences and trends on 
examinations administered by the College Board. The information in this 
monograph includes results of the performance of students from 
Massachusetts, New Englandandthenationasa whole since 1971-72 on such 
examinations as the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT), Test of Standard Written 
English (TSWE), Achievement Tests and Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude 
Test/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test (PSAT/NMSQT). 

This publication has been prepared as a sequel to a Massachusetts 
Department of Education study published in 1976 entitled Declining Test 
Scores: A State Study. That study analyzed available statewide data on the SAT, 
Achievement Tests and PSAT in order to examine some of the hypotheses 
occurring since the early 1960's. While this publication does not contain any 
further analysis of the reasons for the score decline, it offers two more years of 
trend data on student performance on the SAT and other related examinations. 
In addition to state, regional and national statistics, it includes three years of 
trend data on the performance of Massachusetts students categorized by the 
kind of community in which they reside. 

Fifteen tables of trend data are included beginning on page 10. In the 
remainder of the introduction, each of the College Board's examinations is 
described. This discussion includes information on the College Board's 
Admission Testing Program (ATP) and the way in which the test scores and 
student background information is collected and reported. Definitions of some of 
the reporting categories, highlights of the data that are reported in the tables, 
and a discussion of the cautions one must apply when generalizing about these 
test results are also presented. Following the tables, a selected bibliography of 
useful resources for further information on the College Board programs can be 
found. Finally, a list identifying Massachusetts school districts by "Kind of 
Community (KOC)" has been appended. 

DESCRIPTION AND PURPOSE OF COLLEGE BOARD EXAMINATIONS AND 
SERVICES 



The Admissions Testing Program (ATP) is a series of examinations and 
services of the College Board designed to assist students, high schools, colleges, 
universities and scholarship agencies with post-secondary decision-making. 
The components of the ATP that are incorporated into this publication are the 
following: 

1 ) The Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) is a 2V2 hour multiple-choice test 
that measures developed verbal and mathematical reasoning abilities. 
It is the most widely administered college admissions examination in 
the country. Over one million high school juniors and seniors annually 
take this test. 

The SAT is intended to supplement the secondary school record and 
other information about the student in assessing competence for 



4 



college work. The SAT provides separate verbal and mathematical 
scores as well as verbal subscores in reading comprehension and 
vocabulary. Individual student performance on the examination is 
reported on a scale of 200-800. The SAT consists of five sections: two 
30-minute verbal sections with a combined total of 85 questions; two 
30-minute mathematical sections with a combined total of 60 
questions; and one 30-minute section that is used for trying out new 
questions and improving the quality of the test. This section does not 
contribute to the students' scores. 

2) The Test of Standard Written English, referred to as TSWE, is a 30- 
minute multiple-choice test administered with the SAT. It evaluates 
students' ability to recognize standard written English, the language of 
most college textbooks, and the one they will be expected to use in 
papers they will write for most college courses. Student scores on the 
TSWE are reported separately on ATP reports. The scores are not 
intended to be used by colleges in making admissions decisions but are 
meant to help place students in an appropriate freshman English 
course. This test contains 50 multiple-choice questions; scores are 
reported on a 20 to 60+ scale. Scores of 60+ indicate that the student's 
abililty goes beyond the range that the test is designed to measure. The 
test is also not designed to distinguish among students whose 
command of standard written English is better than average. 

3) The Achievement Tests are one-hour multiple-choice examinations 
designed to assess the skills students have developed in a particular 
subject, their knowledge of that subject, and their ability to apply that 
knowledge to new materials and situations. A current exception to this 
format is the December 1977 form of the English Composition Test 
which includes 40 minutes of multiple-choice questions and one 20 
minute essay assignment. Some colleges use Achievement Test 
Scores not only in admissions, but also for placement — especially of 
freshmen in English, mathematics and foreign language courses. 
Others use them in guidance and counseling. Committees of 
experienced high school and college teachers set specifications and 
review the Achievement Tests. These tests are intended to be 
appropriate for a wide range of secondary school courses. Although no 
marked changes in emphasis or types of questions are made each year, 
the tests do reflect changes in high school curricula. 

Achievement Test are given in English Composition, Literature, 
American History and Social Studies, European History and World 
Cultures, Mathematics — Level 1, Mathematics — Level 11, French, 
German, Hebrew, Latin, Russian, Spanish, Biology, Chemistry and 
Physics. The tables in this publication provide information on student 
performance on all tests except European History, Mathematics — 
Level 11, German, Hebrew, Latin, Russian and Physics. 

Each summer the College Board produces a series of reports summarizing 
the ATP test scores and data from the Student Descriptive Questionnaires for 
students in the previous year's senior class. An extensive series of statistical 
tables are sent to every high school that had at least 100 seniors who 
participated in the ATP. Abbreviated versions of these reports are sentto all high 
schools which had 50 to 99 participating seniors. Summary reports are also 
produced for colleges and groups of secondary schools and colleges. 



The ATP data compiled in this publication were obtained from the ATP 
summary reports that are produced each year for states, regions, and the nation. 
These data are published in a series of monographs entitled College-Bound 
Seniors. National and Massachusetts reports have been available since 1 971 - 
72 (the high school graduating class of 1 972); the New England regional reports 
have been available since 1 972-73, although average scores on the SAT have 
been calculated for New England students since 1 971 -72. The information on 
Massachusetts schools categorized by Kind of Community (KOC) were obtained 
from special summary reports compiled by the College Board since 1 974-75 at 
the request of the Massachusetts Department of Education. All of the data 
contained in Tables 1-13 of this publication were obtained either from the 
College-Bound Seniors series or the special KOC reports. 

The Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test/National Merit Scholarship 
Qualifying Test (PSAT/NMSQT) is a shortened version of the SAT which is 
administered to high school juniors during their fall semester. It serves as a 
practice test for the SAT and since 1 971 -72, the results have been also used to 
award the National Merit Scholarships. The PSAT/NMSQT is scored on a scale 
of 20 to 80, corresponding to the SAT scale of 200 to 800. Most of the 
PSAT/NMSQT information that can be found in Tables 1 4 and 1 5 were obtained 
directly from the New England Regional Office of the College Board. The New 
England office of the College Board has recently made available annual 
monographs entitled PSAT/NMSQT Summary Reports. 

OVERVIEW OF TABLES 

The tables trend data on the College Board examinations are organized as 
follows: 

Tables 1-6 SAT Trends 

Tables 7-8 Test of Standard Written English Trends 

Tables 9-1 1 Achievement Test Trends 

Tables 12-13 Selected Statistics on College-Bound Seniors 

Tables 14-15 PSAT/NMSQT Trends 

There are a few terms used in these tables that need to be defined for the 
reader. These terms and their definitions are as follows: 

1 ) Average score -The average score of a group of test results is the same 
as the arithmetical mean. It is computed by adding up all of the 
individual test scores and dividing the sum by the number of test 
scores. 

2) The Student Descriptive Questionnaire, referred to as the SDQ, is 
voluntarily completed by students when they register for the ATP. It 
contains questions about the students' background, academic record, 
extra-curricular activities and plans for college study. Approximately 
85% of students nationally who register for the ATP complete the 
questionnaire. 

3) College-Bound Seniors - This term refers to all of the students who 
were graduated or whose class was graduated from a high school at 
the end of the school year. For example, the college-bound seniors for 
1 977 refers to the students who were graduated or could be eligible to 
graduate from a secondary school in June 1 977, and who registered for 
the ATP before the spring of their senior year. The test data on "col lege - 
bound seniors" are calculated from all the scores of seniors from a 



given graduating class plus all the scores of the previous years' 
sophomores or juniors who did not retake the exams as seniors. If an 
individual took an exam more than once, only the latest score for that 
student is included in the summary report analysis. 

The term "College-Bound Senior" designates student intent since a 
few of the students who take the SAT never attend an institution of 
higher education. The "College-Bound Senior" statistics for 
Massachusetts, New England and the nation include the test scores 
and descriptive information from students in public and non-public 
schools. The Massachusetts KOC data include only information which 
is drawn from public schools. 

4) Kind of Community (KOC) - Based on information concerning its size, 
financial and demographic characteristics, each school district in 
Massachusetts was assigned to one of four Kind of Communities or 
KOC's. The KOC classification was developed from a 1973 division by 
the Massachusetts Department of Administration and Finance of all 
cities and towns in the state into one of fourteen groups. The purpose of 
this grouping was to study the effects of modifications in state aid 
formulas. Groups were organized on the basis of family income level, 
size, degree of industrialization, type of community (urban, suburban, 
rural), and tax rate. These fourteen groups were collapsed into four 
groups by the Massachusetts Department of Education in 1974. The 
four KOC's are as follows: 

KOC 1 : Big Cities generally refer to communities designated as central cities 
according to the 1970 United States Census. Examples of 
Massachusetts big cities include Brockton, Haverhill, Holyoke, 
Lawrence, Worcester. 

KOC 2: Industrial Suburbs generally include three types of communities; 
suburbs in the inner Boston circle with below average family income 
and with more than 20% commercial and 7% industrial land use; 
suburbs in the outer Boston circle with below average family income 
and with more than 20% commercial land use; and suburbs of central 
cities other than Boston with below average family income and with 
more than 20% commercial and 7% industrial land use. Examples of 
industrial suburbs are Cambridge, Chelsea, Medford, Quincy, Peabody, 
Waltham, Lee and Monson. 

KOC 3: Residential Suburbs generally fall into three categories: suburbs of 
Boston (not industrial suburbs) with average family incomes up to 
$16,000; suburbs of Boston (not industrial suburbs) with average 
family incomes over $1 6,000; and suburbs of central cities other than 
Boston with above average family incomes. Examples include 
Arlington, Braintree, Framingham, Scituate, Walpole, Andover, Dover, 
Milton, Newton, Chelmsford, Shrewsbury, Wilbraham. 

KOC 4: Small Towns and Other Communities generally include the following 
types: resort towns in the Cape Cod area; resort towns in the Berkshire 
area; suburbs of cities other than Boston (not industrial suburbs) with 
less than average family income; towns with below average family 
income and industrial/commercial land use; towns with below 
average family income that are non-industrial, non-commercial and 
non-resort areas; and communities with a population of less than 



2,500 inhabitants but not resort areas. Examples of small towns and 
other communities include Barnstable, Chatham, Yarmouth, 
Stockbridge, Bridgewater, Hadley, Oxford, Stoughton, Newburyport, 
Taunton, Ayer, Kingston, Orange, Webster, Ashfield, Dunstable, 
Plympton. 

A listing of all Massachusetts cities and towns by KOC can be found in 
the appendix. 



II. HIGHLIGHTS OF TRENDS 



The data presented in the tables that follow indicate several trends 
regarding the characteristics of high school students in Massachusetts, New 
England and the nation who have taken one or more of the examinations 
administered by the College Board between 1971-72 and 1976-77. Prior to 
indicating some of these trends, it is important for the reader to be aware of 
some limitations on the extent to which standardized test scores should be used 
as a basis for making generalizations on overall student achievement levels. 

First, it should be noted that standardized tests only measure a very small 
percentage of the wide range of skills and knowledge that students acquire both 
in and out of school. Any generalizations about student achievement made on 
the basis of test scores should be restricted to what the examinations measure. 
The SAT, for example, measures verbal and mathematical reasoning abilities 
considered those most commonly needed for successful academic performance 
in colleges and universities. Unlike the Achievement Tests, it does not measure 
specific knowledge taught in schools. Student performance on the SAT should 
thus not be used as a sole basis for making generalizations about the overall 
achievement levels of high school students. 

Secondly, standardized tests represent only one of several ways of 
assessing student achievement and should not be the only criterion used for 
pupil evaluation. Other techniques that teachers and schools use for evaluating 
student performance include teacher-made tests, observation, classroom 
achievement and grades. 

Finally, the average score of a group of students that take an examination 
is highly dependent on the percentage of eligible students who actually take a 
test, as well as the characteristics of these test-takers. Characteristics of the 
test-taking population that would affect average scores include sex, race, class 
rank, grade point average, socioeconomic status and type of academic 
preparation. One would expect, for example, that the average performance 
levels on an examination administered in a high school would be significantly 
higher if only students ranked in the top tenth percentile took the test rather than 
all the students in the school. Thus, before comparing the average scores of 
groups from year to year on examinations like the SAT and Achievement Tests, 
one should investigate what changes have taken place in the proportion of 
eligible students and the characteristics of the students who actually took the 
test. 

The significant trends in the performance and characteristics of high 
school students in Massachusetts and the nation who took a College Board 
administered examination are as follows: 

1 ) There has been a continuous decline between 1 971 -72 and 1 976-77 
on the average performance level of Massachusetts and national 
students on the SAT verbal examination. The extenuof the decline (24 
points) has been the same and the actual averages have been virtually 
identical in Massachusetts and the nation (see Table 1). 

2) There has been a continuous decline between 1 971 -72 and 1 976-77 
on the average performance of Massachusetts and national students 
on the SAT mathematics examination, although the decline is not as 

g pronounced as on the verbal component. While the extent of the 



decline (14 to 1 5 points) has been the same in Massachusetts and the 
nation, the Massachusetts average scores have ranged from three to 
five points below the national averages (see Table 3). 

3) The average verbal SAT scores for males in both Massachusetts and 
the nation have remained slightly higher than the female averages. In 
mathematics, the average malescores have consistently been40to 50 
points higher than the female (see Tables 2 and 4). 

4) In general, Massachusetts public schools, regardless of the Kind of 
Community they represent, have experienced score declines in the 
past three years on the SAT verbal section. With the exception of 
schools in residential suburbs, all have experienced slight declines on 
the mathematics section (see Tables 5 and 6). 



5) In Massachusetts and New England, a much higher percentage of 
eligible students registered for the ATP than is the case for students 
registered for the ATP nationwide. In 1976-77, for example, 64% of the 
approximately 94,000 high school graduates registered for the ATP in 
Massachusetts (and 62% of the graduates in New England) as 
compared to 33% of the graduates nationwide (this information was 
only calculated for one year and cannot be found in any of the Tables). 



6) The percentage of Massachusetts and national students who reported 
they were ranked in the top tenth of their class has remained almost 
identical since 1 971 -72. The students' estimated grade point averages 
have increased over this period in both cases (see Tables 1 2 and 1 3). 

7) The average performance of Massachusetts students on the 
achievement tests has continuously been 25-30 points below the 
national average. This trend may be attributable to the fact that a much 
greater percentage of students registered for the ATP in 
Massachusetts took at least one achievement test as compared to 
students nationally. In 1 976-77, for example, 44% of the students took 
at least one achievement test as compared to 21% nationally (see 
Tables 9 and 10). 

8) There has been an increase between 1971-72 and 1976-77 on the 
average performance level of Massachusetts and national students on 
the Achievement Tests (1 1 point increase in Massachusetts and 7 
points nationally). The increase on the achievement test may be 
attributable, in part, to the fact that both in Massachusetts and the 
nation, the number and percentage of students taking at least one 
achievement test have been decreasing since 1 971 -72 (see Tables 1 2 
and 13). 

9) On the Test of Standard Written English, average scores have declined 
slightly since 1974-75 for students in Massachusetts and nationally. 
Massachusetts students perform slightly better than students 
nationally (see Table 7). 

10) The average national PSAT/NMSQT scores on both the verbal and 
mathematical sections have declined slightly since 1971-72. The 
same trend has occurred in Massachusetts since 1 973-74 (see Tables 
14 and 15). 



III. TABLES ON COLLEGE BOARD EXAMINATION TRENDS 



age 



Scholastic Aptitude Test Trends 

Test of Standard Written English Trends 

Achievement Test Trends 

Selected Statistics on College-Bound Seniors 

Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude/ NMSQT Test Trend 



11 


- 16 


17 • 


■ 18 


19 


- 21 


22- 


23 


24 


■25 



10 




September, 1978 



This report is the first of a series of annual supplements to each table in Declining Test 
Scores: An Update. It provides school committee members, school administrators, coun- 
selors, teachers, parents, and other citizens in Massachusetts information on current 
experiences and trends on examinations administered by the College Board. 

Accompanying the 1978 Admissions Testing Program data are several samples of tables 
and graphs that have proven very useful to schools in the preparation of data for reporting 
and record keeping purposes. School personnel interested in longitudinal comparisons 
should complete these tables with data that have been provided on their own high school 
college-bound seniors. 



DECLINING TEST SCORES: 1978 UPDATE 



TABLE 1 — AVERAGE SAT-VERBAL SCORES FOR ALL COLLEGE-BOUND SENIORS: NATIONAL, 



NEW ENGLAND AND MASSACHUSETTS 



NATIONAL 
429 



NEW ENGLAND 
433 



MASSACHUSETTS 
430 



1977-78 
TABLE 2 — AVERAGE SAT-VERBAL SCORES BY SEX: NATIONAL AND MASSACHUSETTS 



NATIONAL 



MASSACHUSETTS 



Male 
433 



Female 
425 



Male 
433 



Female 
427 



1977-78 
TABLE 3 — AVERAGE SAT-MATHEMATICS SCORES FOR ALL COLLEGE-BOUND SENIORS: 



NATIONAL, NEW ENGLAND AND MASSACHUSETTS 



NATIONAL 
468 



NEW ENGLAND 
468 



MASSACHUSETTS 
465 



1977-78 
TABLE 4 — AVERAGE SAT-MATHEMATICS SCORES BY SEX: NATIONAL AND MASSACHUSETTS 



NATIONAL 



MASSACHUSETTS 



Male 
494 



Female 
444 



Male 
488 



Female 
444 



1977-78 
TABLE 5 — AVERAGE VERBAL SAT SCORES BY KIND OF COMMUNITY FOR MASSACHUSETTS 



1977-78 
TABLE 6 

1977-78 



PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

KOC 1 KOC 2 

407 405 



KOC 3 

441 



KOC 4 
425 



All Mass. Publics 



428 



AVERAGE MATHEMATICS SAT SCORES BY KIND OF COMMUNITY FOR 
MASSACHUSETTS PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



KOC 1 
438 



KOC 2 
441 



KOC 3 
484 



KOC 4 
459 



All Mass. Publics 
467 



Publication #10779 approved by Alfred C. Holland, State Purchasing Agent. 



TABLE 7 — AVERAGE TEST OF STANDARD WRITTEN ENGLISH SCORES: NATIONAL, NEW 
ENGLAND AND MASSACHUSETTS 

NATIONAL NEW ENGLAND MASSACHUSETTS 

1977-78 42.8 43.6 43.4 



TABLE 8 — AVERAGE TEST OF STANDARD WRITTEN ENGLISH SCORES BY KIND OF 
COMMUNITY FOR MASSACHUSETTS PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

KOC 1 KOC 2 KOC 3 KOC 4 All Mass. Publics 

1977-78 41.2 41.4 44.5 43.0 43.3 



TABLE 9 — AVERAGE ACHIEVEMENT TEST SCORES FOR ALL NATIONAL COLLEGE-BOUND 



SENIORS 
















Avg. for 


Eng. 


Math 


Amer. 










All Ach. 


Comp. 


Level I 


Hist. 


Biol. 


Chem. 


Fren. 


Lit. 


531 


512 


541 


496 


544 


577 


552 


521 



1977-78 



TABLE 10 — AVERAGE ACHIEVEMENT TEST SCORES FOR ALL MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGE- 



BOUND SENIORS 














Avg. for Eng. 


Math 


Amer. 










All Ach. Comp. 


Level I 


Hist. 


Biol. 


Chem. 


Fren. 


Lit. 


505 493 


511 


486 


510 


535 


555 


497 



1977-78 



TABLE 11 — AVERAGE ACHIEVEMENT TEST SCORES (ALL ACHIEVEMENT TESTS) BY KIND OF 
COMMUNITY FOR MASSACHUSETTS PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

KOC 1 KOC 2 KOC 3 KOC 4 All Mass. Publics 

1977-78 503 477 514 503 507 



TABLE 12 — SELECTED STATISTICS ON COLLEGE-BOUND SENIORS REGISTERED FOR THE 
ADMISSIONS TESTING PROGRAM: NATIONALLY 

# Stud. Reg. % Male/ % Reg. for % from % % Stud. Reg. 

for ATP Female ATP 1 ACH Pub. Minority Top 1/10 Est. GPA 

1977-78 1,034,096 48.4/51.6 20% 82% 17% 22% 3.09 



TABLE 13 — SELECTED STATISTICS ON COLLEGE-BOUND SENIORS REGISTERED FOR THE 
ADMISSIONS TESTING PROGRAM: MASSACHUSETTS 

# Stud. Reg. % Male/ % Reg. for % from % % Stud. Reg. 

for ATP Female ATP 1 ACH Pub. Minority Top 1/10 Est. GPA 

1977-78 60,080 48.3/51.7 44% 81% 7% 17% 2.92 



TABLE 14 — AVERAGE PSAT/NMSQT VERBAL SCORES: NATIONAL AND MASSACHUSETTS 

NATIONAL MASSACHUSETTS 

1977-78 40.0 40.7 



TABLE 15. — AVERAGE PSAT/NMSQT MATHEMATICS SCORES: NATIONAL AND MASSACHUSETTS 

NATIONAL MASSACHUSETTS 

1977-78 44.2 43.9 



SAMPLE REPORT TABLE I 

SAT VERBAL AND MATHEMATICS MEANS FOR 1971-72 TO 1977-78 











Mass. 


N.E. 


National 










College- 


College- 


College- 




Local 


Local 


All Mass. 


Bound 


Bound 


Bound 




High School 


KOC 


Publics 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 




V M 


V M 


V M 


V M 


V M 


V M 


1971-72 




N.A. N.A. 


N.A. N.A. 


453 480 


456 482 


453 484 


1972-73 




N.A. N.A. 


N.A. N.A. 


444 481 


447 482 


445 481 


1973-74 




N.A. N.A. 


N.A. N.A. 


445 477 


447 479 


444 480 


1974-75 






429 467 


434 469 


437 471 


434 472 


1975-76 






427 468 


432 469 


435 472 


431 472 


1976-77 






426 466 


429 465 


432 468 


429 470 


1977-78 






428 467 


430 465 


433 468 


429 468 



N.A. = Not Available 



SAMPLE REPORT TABLE 

MEAN SCORES 













Mass. 


N.E. 


National 












College- 


College- 


College- 




Local 


Local 


All IV 


ass. 


Bound 


Bound 


Bound 




High School 


KOC 


Publics 


Seniors 


Seniors 


Seniors 




1977 1978 


1977 1978 


1977 


1978 


1977 1978 


1977 1978 


1977 1978 


SAT-V-AII 






426 


428 


429 430 


432 433 


429 429 


Male 






426 


430 


431 433 


433 436 


431 433 


Female 






426 


427 


427 427 


431 430 


427 425 


SAT-M - All 






466 


467 


465 465 


468 468 


470 468 


Male 






489 


489 


489 488 


492 492 


497 494 


Female 






445 


447 


443 444 


445 446 


445 444 


TSWE 






43.1 


43.3 


43.3 43.4 


43.6 43.6 


42.9 42.8 


ACH Average 






507 


507 


506 505 


508 508 


533 531 


Eng. Comp. 






492 


492 


493 493 


496 496 


516 512 


Math Level I 






522 


517 


516 511 


520 515 


547 541 


Am. History 






470 


481 


475 486 


473 483 


492 496 


Biology 






512 


516 


509 510 


508 509 


543 544 


Chemistry 






537 


537 


535 535 


535 539 


574 577 


French 






550 


549 


555 555 


556 556 


553 552 


Literature 






501 


495 


502 497 


504 499 


526 521 


PSAT/NMSQT 
















Verbal 




N.A. N.A. 


N.A. 


N.A. 


40.9 40.7 


41.1 40.9 


40.5 40.0 


Math 




N.A. N.A. 


N.A. 


N.A. 


44.7 43.9 


45.0 44.2 


45.0 44.2 



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IV. SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY AND INFORMATION 
CONTACTS 



COLLEGE BOARD 

The College Board publishes a number of publications that are useful 
resources for additional information about the AdmissionsTesting Program and 
the Summary Report Service. These publications are as follows: 

1 . About the Achievement Tests 

2. About the SAT and the Test of Standard Written English 

3. Announcing the English Composition Test with Essay 

4. Guide to the Admissions Testing Program 1 977-78 

5. Massachusetts: College-Bound Seniors, 1977-78 

6. National Report: College-Bound Seniors, 1977 

7. New England: College-Bound Seniors, 1 977 

8. School Guide to the 1 977 Summary Reports 

9. Student Bulletin 1977-78 

10. The College Board Today: A Guide to Its Programs and Services 
1977 

In addition to these annual monographs, the College Board has 
published the following research studies related to the development 
and recent score trends of their examinations: 

1 . The College Board Admissions Testing Program: A Technical Report on 
Research and Development activites Relating to the Scholastic 
Aptitude Test and Achievement Tests. William Angoff, editor. 1971 

2. On Further Examination: Report of the Advisory Panel on the 
Scholastic Aptitude Test Score Decline. Wirtz Commission, 1977. 
Includes an annotated list of 27 special studies and papers 
commissioned by the advisory panel. 

In order to obtain these publications or to receive further information on 
the ATP and national or individual school scores, please contact: 

New England Regional Office 
College Entrance Examination Board 
470 Totten Pond Road 
Waltham, Massachusetts 02154 
617/890-9150 

MASSACHUSETTS DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

The Massachusetts Department of Education has published the following 
study on the SAT decline: 

Declining Test Scores: A State Study, Bureau of Research and Assessment 

In order to obtain this publication or to receive additional information on 
regional, state and kind of community scores, please contact: 

Bureau of Research and Assessment 
Department of Education 
31 St. James Avenue 
Boston, Massachusetts 021 1 6 
26 617/727-8497 



APPENDIX 



WAS: 


SACHUSETTS CITIES 


AND TOWNS BY "KIND 


OF 


: COMMUNITY" 


KOC 


SCHOOL SYSTEM KOC 


SCHOOL SYSTEM KOC 


SCHOOL SYSTEM 


3 


Abington 


2 


Chelsea 


4 


Greenfield 


3 


Acton 


4 


Chesterfield Union 66 


3 


Groton Union 46 


4 


Acushnet 


1 


Chicopee 


4 


Groveland Union 53 


4 


Agawam 


4 


Chilmark Union 1 9 


4 


Hadley 


4 


Amesbury 


4 


Clarksburg Union 43 


4 


Halifax Union 31 


3 


Amherst Union 26 


4 


Clinton 


3 


Hamilton Union 57 


3 


Andover 


3 


Cohasset 


4 


Hampden 


3 


Arlington 


3 


Concord 


4 


Hancock Union 69 


4 


Ashburnham Union 56 


4 


Conway Union 38 


3 


Hanover 


4 


Ashfield Union 65 


3 


Danvers 


4 


Hanson 


3 


Ashland 


4 


Dartmouth 


4 


Hardwick Union 63 


4 


Athol 


3 


Dedham 


4 


Harvard 


4 


Attleboro 


4 


Deerfield Union 38 


4 


Harwich 


2 


Auburn 


4 


Dennis Union 1 1 


4 


Hatfield 


3 


Avon 


4 


Dighton Union 37 


1 


Haverhill 


4 


Ayer 


4 


Douglas 


3 


Hingham 


4 


Barnstable 


3 


Dover Union 50 


3 


Holbrook 


4 


Barre Union 63 


4 


Dracut 


3 


Holden Union 64 


3 


Bedford 


4 


Dunstable Union 46 


4 


Holland Union 61 


4 


Belchertown 


3 


Duxbury 


3 


Holliston 


4 


Bellingham 


4 


East Bridgewater 


1 


Hoyloke 


3 


Belmont 


4 


East Brookfield Union 7 


4 


Hopedale 


4 


Berkley Union 37 


4 


Eastam Union 54 


3 


Hopkinton 


4 


Berlin Union 60 


2 


Easthampton 


4 


Hubbardston Union 63 


4 


Bernardston Union 18 


3 


East Longmeadow 


3 


Hudson 


3 


Beverly 


3 


Easton 


3 


Hull 


4 


Bxxxxxxx 


4 


Edgartown Union 19 


4 


Ipswich 


5 


Blackstone Union 44 


4 


Erving Union 28 


4 


Kingston Union 31 


4 


Bolton Union 47 


4 


Essex Union 48 


4 


Lakeville Union 34 


1 


Boston 


2 


Everett 


4 


Lancaster 


4 


Bourne Union 10 


4 


Fairhaven 


4 


Lanesborough Union 69 


4 


Boxborough Union 42 


1 


Fall River 


1 


Lawrence 


3 


Boxford Union 58 


4 


Falmouth 


2 


Lee Union 29 


3 


Boylston Union 60 


1 


Fitchburg 


4 


Leicester 


3 


Braintree 


4 


Florida Union 43 


4 


Lenox 


4 


Brewster Union 


3 


Foxborough 


1 


Leominster 


4 


Bridgewater 


3 


Framingham 


4 


Leverett Union 28 


4 


Brimfield Union 61 


4 


Franklin 


3 


Lexington 


1 


Brockton 


4 


Freetown Union 34 


4 


Leyden Union 18 


4 


Brookfield Union 61 


4 


Gardner 


3 


Lincoln 


3 


Brookline 


4 


Georgetown 


3 


Littleton 


3 


Burlington 


4 


Gill Union 18 


3 


Longmeadow 


2 


Cambridge 


4 


Gloucester 


1 


Lowell 


3 


Canton 


4 


Goshen Union 66 


4 


Ludlow 


3 


Carlisle 


4 


Gosnold Union 37 


4 


Lunenburg 


4 


Carver Union 62 


3 


Grafton 


2 


Lynn 


4 


Chatham 


4 


Granby 


3 


Lynnfield 


3 


Chelmsford 


4 


Granville Union 39 


2 


Maiden 



27 



KOC 



SCHOOL SYSTEM 



KOC 



SCHOOL SYSTEM 



KOC 



SCHOOL SYSTEM 



3 


Manchester Union 


48 


4 


Oak Bluffs Union 19 


4 


Southampton Union 66 


4 


Mansfield 




4 


Oakham Union 63 


3 


Southborough Union 3 


3 


Marblehead 




4 


Orange 


4 


Southbridge 


4 


Marion Union 55 




4 


Orleans Union 54 


4 


South Hadley 


4 


Marlborough 




4 


Otis Union 29 


4 


Southwick Union 39 


3 


Marshfield 




4 


Oxford 


4 


Spencer 



4 Mashpee Union 10 

4 Mattapoisett Union 55 

4 Maynard 

3 Medfield 

2 Medford 

4 Medway 

3 Melrose 

4 Merrimac Union 53 
4 Methuen 

4 Middleborough 

3 Middleton 

4 Milford 



2 


Millbury 


3 


Millis 


4 


Millville Union 44 


3 


Milton 


4 


Monroe Union 43 


2 


Monson 


4 


Montague 


3 


Nahant 


4 


Nantucket 


3 


Natick 


3 


Needham 


1 


New Bedford 


4 


New Braintree Union 12 


3 


Newbury Union 68 


4 


Newburyport 


4 


New Salem Union 28 


3 


Newton 


3 


Norfolk 



28 



4 North Adams 

4 Northampton 

3 North Andover 

4 North attleborough 

3 Northborough Union 3 

4 Northbridge 

4 North Brookfield Union 7 

4 Northfield Union 18 

3 North Reading 

4 Norton 
3 Norwell 
3 Norwood 



4 Palmer 

3 Paxton Union 64 

2 Peabody 

4 Pelham Union 

3 Pembroke Union 26 

4 Petersham 

4 Phillipston Union 1 

1 Pittsfield 
4 Plainville 

4 Plymouth Union 62 

4 Plympton Union 31 

4 Princeton Union 64 

4 Provincetown Union 14 

2 Quincy 

3 Randolph 
3 Raynham 

3 Reading 

4 Rehoboth Union 37 

2 Revere 

4 Richmond Union 69 

4 Rochester Union 55 

3 Rockland 

3 Rockport 

4 Rowe Union 65 

4 Rowley Union 68 

4 Royalston Union 1 

4 Rutland Union 64 

2 Salem 

4 Salisbury Union 68 

4 Sandsfield Union 39 

4 Sandwich Union 10 

3 Saugus 

4 Savoy Union 43 
3 Scituate 

3 Seekonk 

3 Sharon 

3 Sherborn Union 50 

4 Shirley Union 42 

3 Shrewsbury 

4 Shutesbury Union 28 
4 Somerset 

2 Somerville 



1 Springfield 

4 Sterling Union 64 

3 Stoneham 

4 Stoughton 

3 Stow Union 47 

3 Sturbridge Union 61 

3 Sudbury 

4 Sunderland Union 38 
4 Sutton 

3 Swampscott 

4 Swansea 
4 Taunton 

3 Templeton Union 1 

3 Tewksbury 

4 Tisbury Union 19 

3 Topsfield Union 58 

4 Truro Union 14 
4 Tyngsborough 

4 Tyringham Union 29 

4 Uxbridge 

3 Wakefield 

4 Wales Union 61 

3 Walpole 
2 Waltham 

4 Ware 

4 Wareham 

2 Warren Union 12 

4 Warwick Union 18 

2 Watertown 

3 Wayland 

4 Webster 

3 Wellesley 

4 Wellfleet Union 54 
4 Wendell Union 28 
3 Wenham Union 57 
3 Westborough 

3 West Boylston 

4 West Bridgewater 

4 West Brookfield Union 12 

4 Westfield 

3 Wesford 

4 Westhampton Union 66 



KOC SCHOOL SYSTEM 



4 


Westminster Union 56 


4 


West Newbury Union 53 


3 


Weston 


4 


Westport 


4 


West Springfield 


4 


West Tisbury Union 19 


3 


Westwood 


3 


Weymouth 


4 


Whately Union 38 


4 


Whitman 


3 


Wilbraham 


4 


Williamsburg Union 66 


3 


Williamstown 


3 


Wilmington 


4 


Winchendon 


3 


Winchester 


3 


Winthrop 


3 


Woburn 



1 Worcester 

3 Wrentham 

4 Yarmouth Union 1 1 



* 



KOC Definitions: 1 = Big City; 2 = Industrial suburb; 
3 = Residential suburb; 4 = Other 



29 



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